Archive for the ‘Energy Policy’ Category

Climate Change Factor Up Five-Fold Over Two Years In Money Manager Decisions, Says Report

The #ESGinvestment sector is consistently ascendant recently with $8.72 trillion (out of a total of $40.3

trillion) under professional management by institutions and money managers that state they consider ESG criteria across a range of asset classes. @Ceres and their network is one of the organizations making an impact on accelerating this sector.

This increase in ESG demand is showing up in the #renewableenergy PPA contract negotiations where price is still important but more than ever sustainability goals are front and center.

As good as this news is, it’s not large enough or fast enough given what the #climatechangescience world is saying about atmospheric GHG accumulation already in place and the increased chances to go beyond 2 degrees C and consequently the tipping point of a runaway planetary “hothouse”.

Ultimately, it would seem we are facing crisis mitigation AND urgent adaptation do to the acceleration.

Full article here

#lowcarboneconomy  #lowcarbonenergy #sustainabilityreporting

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

The “Resource Curse” and Renewable Energy

The “resource curse” in this article below goes away in a #renewableenergy dominated world.

Its striking that the communities globally that supply #coal, #oil, #gas and other #fossilfuels are some of the poorest and most polluted on earth. These are sad social and environmental justice stories in this article and are hard to read. All consumers of the downstream products are part of this story and can make a different choice.

Renewable energy is a main component of the electrified world in the #lowcarbonenergy economy. With its modularity and lack of a fuel supply chain, its easily and quickly deployable in all 195 countries on earth without “resource curse” communities. Speed to a clean energy market with social and environmental justice included is hard to beat.

But it takes is good governance at all levels to make it a reality.

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Do Chinese PV Subsidies Machinations Matter In The “Electrify Everything” World?

An informative piece from Finlay Colville on the recent Chinese government decision to limit further #solarpvPV industry support. Is this deja vu all over again from the 2012 module over supply or does it no longer matter?

“The impending downturn is not happening because of a PR from government bodies in China in late May 2018. It is the unavoidable consequence of 2 – 3 years of chronic over investment across the c-Si value-chain in China that was a time bomb waiting to explode.”

Question I have is, if if electrifying the whole global energy sector of means that electricity production needs to increase massively via #renewableenergy to meet Paris accords timeline – roughly tripling over the next 20 years – does China’s manipulation of the markets matter as much going forward? Is there a downturn or is this a short blip?

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

The Low Carbon Energy Revolution – Solving the Management and Culture Challenge Begins with EQ

Low carbon energy transition This is the second of five posts that focus on the challenges and solutions of the low carbon energy transition. (See first post here.)

The management and culture challenge may be the most important factor to work through before accelerating diversification and transition efforts, according to industry leaders who are driving the energy transition.low carbon energy, decarbonization

Corporate culture is often defined as the collection of shared values, visions, customs, traditions and internal goals that contribute to a company’s uniqueness. Consciously or unconsciously formed by business owners or founders, corporate culture issues can inspire or impede the success of team efforts to reach company goals.

With something as significant as moving from an established fossil fuel company to a low carbon energy business, the basic challenge is how to make fundamental internal changes that will accommodate the new business model in a demanding, highly ambiguous market environment. It’s essentially an entrepreneurial startup with a large number of tenured employees.

Success stories of corporate innovation and incubation in this kind of environment are as rare as a certain mythical rainbow-riding flying horse.

The Harvard Business Review has called it a “two culture problem.” Revenue from existing operations carry the company, which is supported by long term, hardwired organizational systems. The company’s operations are well tuned, there is a referable market history to guide decisions and management goals for stability, efficiency, and consistent incremental growth.

New innovative business groups tend to form cultures on an ad hoc basis that are wholly different from the main company. There is usually no input or forethought into culture creation; the focus is on the product offering and getting it to market. Innovators and risk takers are often hired from outside the company, bringing in a culture that supports operating models that are entrepreneurial at the core. Existing employees transferred into this group will have difficulty adapting this new operating environment, which often ends up in chaos.

That chaos, according to Home Depot CEO Robert Nardelli, happens because “there’s only a fine line between entrepreneurship and insubordination.” Depending on your vantage point, what looks like innovation flies in the face of established corporate convention.

Emotional Intelligence Diminishes the Two-Culture Problem

According to Amy Steindler, an emotional intelligence coach for corporations and executives, and President of EQ Insights, emotional intelligence training and coaching are at the heart of successful corporate incubation of a new innovative group. Her perspective on the need for emotional intelligence at the executive and cultural levels for a successful low carbon energy transition comprises the remainder of this post.

Two decades of academic research, much of it found here, suggests that emotional intelligence may be the differentiator between sustainable outperformance and mediocre results, assuming cognitive intelligence (IQ) and industry and technical knowledge are up to speed.

The low carbon transition executives who emerge as industry leaders will be those who recognize the two-culture problem and embrace emotional intelligence as the bridge to change management and to balancing dual cultures operating under the same roof.

Just as emotional intelligence has a role in change management at the team level, it also serves as the foundational skill set for “managing up.”  Executives must engage corporate board members in adopting a significant business model revision while skillfully managing the challenging work of cultural change.  This balancing act will take a measure of emotional intelligence all by itself.  The good news is that as they make the business case for long-term profitability that results from retaining top talent with demonstrable emotional intelligence skills, they will have the support of rigorous academic research and in-depth case studies.

Emotions Provide Essential Data for Integrating Innovative Teams

Executive management has historically had an aversion to the “soft skills” side of emotional intelligence—mindfulness, self-awareness, appropriate emotional expression, empathy and optimism—claiming that they aren’t directly measurable on the balance sheet for which they feel responsible.  This perspective misses a crucial understanding of the role of emotional intelligence in the workplace.

Emotions are data, and the data points that come from practicing emotional intelligence skills are critical elements for success in two key areas: decision-making and stress management.

Neuroscience has shown that “rational” decisions are actually emotional ones.  Even after we’ve gathered every bit of analytical data available, we ultimately solve problems based on preferences.  In other words, we don’t make decisions based strictly on the data.  We make decisions based on how we feel about the data.  Faced with two equally rational choices, we pick the one we feel better about.  Without the ability to tap into our emotional data set, which includes acknowledging our true risk tolerance, and our response to mistakes, we are unable to choose among logically sound alternatives, a syndrome known as “analysis paralysis.”

For an innovation team working with little or no market history or data, decision-making relies on their ability to manage intuitive and emotional data sets.  Understanding which data are relevant requires application of specific emotional intelligence skills that govern reality testing, impulse control, and intuitive problem-solving.

Emotional intelligence skills also underlie an organization’s ability to consistently manage healthy responses to the unpredictable and unavoidable fallout that comes from rapid or continuous change.  New divisions are hotbeds of ambiguity, insecurity, and the inevitable trial-and-error mistake making.  No matter how much leaders know about their industry, they won’t be able to realize their strategic vision without a team that functions well under stress. That stress is amplified in the low carbon energy era, because while the regulatory environment is highly uncertain, market drivers still require that companies make significant long-term decisions now, before a complete set of regulations are in place.

For well-established companies attempting the transition to 21st (and 22nd) century sustainable energy production, hiring experienced executives who also model emotional intelligence (and who make the resources available for ongoing assessments, training, and reinforcement) is the key to long-term success.  Existing executive teams who have become successful without a focus on emotional intelligence or mindful leadership will have to make a choice—experience the discomfort of learning a new paradigm of leadership or lose their competitive edge.

Established industry leaders who exist right now in a comfort zone they’ve earned over decades of hard work may find that innovation has given way to a prosperous status quo that they’re reluctant to tinker with.

Success in the low carbon energy transition will require executive teams to intentionally normalize discomfort in order to spark innovation and demonstrate the flexibility, responsiveness, social responsibility and inspiration necessary to engage millennial and subsequent generations.

Effective transition leaders will recognize that the workforce and emerging leadership of the next several decades respond enthusiastically to leadership they perceive to be handling the pace of change with authenticity, transparency and accessibility.

A Metaphor for Putting Employees FirstLow carbon energy

The transition from fossil fuel-based energy to low carbon sources is a metaphor of modernization that goes beyond production of energy.  Energy producers will have to take into account information that they can’t un-know: just as fossil fuel energy production is not sustainable, neither are the management models that served to build the industry decades ago.  The next generation of workers has witnessed the costs of overwork and burnout by observing their predecessors’ quality of life, and they’re not buying into it.  They’re willing to work, but they’re not willing to sacrifice the most productive years of their lives by working for companies that don’t put social responsibility and the well-being of their employees first.

How can executives lead the cultural transition?  By creating a permanent culture of mindfulness-based emotional intelligence, ongoing training, and skillful coaching.  By using the appropriate tools to assess every team member’s emotional intelligence profile, and to understand which combinations of skills are the best predictors of success for a given role on a given team.  By engaging an experienced coach or consultant to model these skills and to guide them in developing their own.  By committing to change management practices that are inclusive and flexible enough to withstand the constant adjustments to new information as it arises.

The executives who will rise to the top as leaders of the low carbon energy transition are the ones who are willing to commit to fresh thinking, curiosity, and the present moment mindfulness that are the hallmarks of innovation and future-focused sustainability.

 

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Where Wind Farms Meet Coal County . . . . . Jobs Are Crucial But At What Cost?

As Upton Sinclair wrote, “’It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” When your livelihood depends on fossil fuel, the political, economic and environmental externalities often hold no interest. This well written and informative piece from the New York Times about competing energy types in Wyoming’s Converse County illustrates vividly this point and the energy sector job conundrum.

Health costs and fatalities caused by coal burning power plants are a seldom-identified externality in the energy jobs discussion. While coal jobs are crucial to the families in the article, nowhere is there any mention about families downwind from coal plants who experience appalling health problems.  Long term studies from the EPA and other peer- reviewed papers show that coal burning kills 15,000 people per year in the U.S. while the coal industry employs only 55,000. Not an acceptable ratio. The cost to treat illnesses from coal burning in the US exceeds 10% of our total health care costs of $3 trillion per year and equals up to 6% of GDP.

Do we need a peer reviewed energy ratio model that can be cited by journalists which states X number of energy job types creates X number of deaths and healthcare costs?

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

To secure our future, we must create it. Now.

< Thank you for taking the time to read and then forwarding then broadly forwarding via email & social media >

Dear Friends,

On November 13, 2017 more than 16,500 scientists from 184 countries published a second warning to humanity, an urgent report with a short 2 page summary and 7 graphs illustrating the key indicators. The acceleration of decline in our planet’s main life sustaining systems is clear. We are at the point of no return on 6 of the indicators.

Climate change is at the heart of many of these degrading earth systems. Extreme heat, wildfires, rain deluges, increases in destructive storm frequency, and flooding due to rising sea levels (8” in the last 100 years, accelerating 2X in the last 20 years) are some of the immediate symptoms.

Will we as individuals allow earth’s systems to rapidly decay without immediate and sustained action?

“As most political leaders respond to pressure, scientists, media influencers, and lay citizens must insist that their governments take immediate action as a moral imperative to current and future generations of human and other life. With a groundswell of organized grassroots efforts, dogged opposition can be overcome and political leaders compelled to do the right thing. It is also time to re-examine and change our individual behaviors…” —World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice 

 We are all living our day to day lives, working, raising families, and hoping to raise our standard of living.  It’s easy to hope that our leaders around the world will solve this problem. They will not.

 It comes down to our active participation and personal responsibility—each of us must contribute to the solution for this very solvable but dire challenge. 

Globally, we have the technology, the proven business models and the economic resources to stop or reverse the damage.  Timely, consistent leadership must come from individual citizens to push governments and corporations to act, and that time is now. 

I’m asking you to do 4 things:

1. Read the attached 2-page warning summary to humanity and then forward this email to your entire network. 

2. Take personal responsibility daily.  Go to  www.timetochoose.com for an extensive list of simple changes to your lifestyle, and view the movie that will inspire you to act.

3. View the Climate Reality Change website for grassroots tools, communication templates and suggestions to equip you to spread the word in your local community.

4. Contact your local, state, and federal representatives now and relay the urgency.  Find contact information for elected representatives from local, state and federal levels, at https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials.

I know, we are all busy and this is one more ask of your valuable time. 

But nothing else matters if we do not have sustaining life systems on earth. 

Please join me now and every day to be part of solving this critical issue to secure our near term and multigenerational future for all species.

Thank you.

Dave P. Buemi

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

How ISOs and RTOs can create a more nimble, robust bulk electricity system and accelerate renewable energy.

Its no secret that the limiting factor for renewable energy growth is the lack of robust and coordinated transmission and the tools to control intermittency. This ISO/RTO Council report is probably the best update on the subject available. A great read and well worth time.

From the executive summary:

“. . . . specifically, the task force seeks to identify where technological deployment intersects with operational and policy considerations. This report is the culmination of that effort.

Source: ISO.RTO Council

In the course of developing this report, three key priorities emerged as imperatives to continuously ensure the reliability and efficiency of the

Bulk Electric System as the penetration of emerging technologies continue to expand. Those identified priorities are as follows:

1. Renewable supply and integration: Many breakthroughs are being made in individual technologies such as renewable generation, grid-scale energy storage and microgrids, for example. However, is there enough innovative activity happening cohesively to integrate all of these disparate components into the overall electricity system?

2. Greater situational awareness: Several technological options are presenting themselves, but are they being exploited to their maximum potential and will they be enough to maintain adequate awareness over a changing system?

3. Controlling an increasingly distributed electricity system: As Distributed Energy Resources (DER)3 increasingly connect to the distribution system, their aggregate impact on the bulk electricity system4 is already evident. To what extent should operation of DERs be ‘controlled’ or influenced by the bulk system operator and what should that relationship look like? What technologies will best assist that framework.”

As this report demonstrates, we have the technology and the knowledge to speed this clean energy transition but we need the political will. It’s time for leadership at all levels to embrace what it is the greatest economic and environmental opportunity of our lifetime.

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Poll: 75 percent of Trump voters want to accelerate the growth of clean energy

A survey by Public Opinion Strategies, a national Republican political and public affairs research firm with its roots in political campaigns, yet again not only illustrates how broad based support is for clean & renewable energy but also the issue by issue disconnects. A good piece here on the survey and the survey itself found here.

 

trump voters clean energy

Source: Public Opinion Strategies, LLC

 

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Fact Checking the Election Claims on Renewable Energy Economics

Of all the events I’ve attended in my 20 years in the solar industry, I will always remember the renewable energy finance conference I attended in 2012 where the major investment banks, pension funds, and project finance entities gave one presentation after another stating they treat wind and solar as any other energy generation asset class when looking at returns and risk. This was a major turning point for the renewables industry, as finance is the heartbeat of the rapidly expanding industry.

Consider the following facts: renewable energy industry growth is >30% YOY on average reaching $30B in 2016, renewables are the largest

http://www.roperld.com/personal/roperldavid.htm

http://www.roperld.com/personal/roperldavid.htm

generator of jobs in the U.S. in the last 4 years and it’s by far the largest sector of new electricity generation for the last 4 years. Since that conference, my phone has been ringing repeatedly, and weekly, with calls from the finance community looking for projects to purchase. Demand for projects far outstrips supply. The rate of return and the low risk profiles are that good.

So it amazes me that our new president and other elected officials can stand in front of the country and claim over and over that wind and solar power does not “pay off in less than 18 years”. Clearly Wall Street and other finance entities do not put capital work into a near USD $1 trillion global industry that are not producing solid, predictable long term returns. (See: global renewable energy investment market to exceed USD 350 billion by 2020) Of course when confronted with actual facts, the conversation go right to the specious argument that taxpayer funded subsidies makes renewable energy projects possible. Anyone that knows me knows my rant on this topic: the fossil fuel industry has 10X more embedded and ongoing subsidies than renewables.

The renewable energy industry has done remarkable work in bringing solar and wind to compete with a highly subsidized fossil fuel industry to a point that it’s now less costly than coal and on par with natural gas derived energy. The investment opportunity has never been better.

An excellent fact book on the U.S. sustainable energy transformation can be found at the bi-partisan Business Council for Sustainable Energy.

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Solar and Wind Manufacturing is Thriving in the USA. Why Don’t Mainstream Reporters Know?

At a time when facts are ignored for expediency of a view point, the fact that renewables are creating more jobs than any other sector needs to be highlighted to the new White House and corrected when junk economics are claimed.

Published on LinkedIn , Co-Founder at Generate Capital, Inc.

Like many Americans, I am an avid listeneus-renewable-energy-manufacturingr to American Public Media’s Marketplace show. The show bills itself as “the most widely heard program on business and the economy — radio or television, commercial or public broadcasting — in the country. That popularity can also be a problem when journalists on the show discuss something they don’t understand.Earlier this month, Marketplace had a weekly roundup on the economy, focusing on manufacturing jobs because of emphasis provided on this topic by both of the presidential campaigns. The guests were John Carney of the Wall Street Journal and Catherine Rampell from the Washington Post.

At the third minute, Rampell weighs in on whether clean energy jobs would really help laid-off manufacturing workers. At 4:30, Carney shows his complete ignorance and claims that clean energy jobs are “science fiction.”

I know that Marketplace knows better. Scott Tong does excellent clean energy reporting for the show on a regular basis.

Let’s set the record straight since Rampell and Carney clearly couldn’t do a basic Google search.

The solar industry alone has created one out of every 80 jobs in the United States since the great recession. When including wind, LED lighting, and other clean energy categories, that number could be close to one in 33.

For the solar industry, a majority of these new employment opportunities are blue collar construction and manufacturing jobs that pay an average of $21 per hour — far higher than the $16 per hour non-union manufacturing jobs that South Carolina was touting later in that episode.

Amazingly, even Kai Ryssdal got into the bashing by questioning if clean energy could make a dent in hiring laid off manufacturing and mining workers.

In fact, the solar industry has hired more veterans than anyone elseretrained coal workers, and even provided a soft landing for oil and gas workers who have lost their jobs. The vast majority of solar and wind workers are trained in less than six months because their previous work experience and training is completely transferrable.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, wind technician is the fastest growing job category — expanding twice as much as the next-fastest growing job, occupational therapy assistant.

In 2015, the manufacturing arms of the solar and wind industries employed tens of thousands of people making pieces and parts in the United States. This is up by 20,000 people over 2014. In fact, this number is expected to continue to grow at that pace for the next five years.

How does an amazing show like Marketplace get these things so wrong? How do folks from the Washington Post and Wall Street Journal not know that solar and wind power now make up over 75 percent of new electric capacity additions in the United States — representing over $70 billion in new capital investment in 2016 alone. In so doing, these industries are generating substantial fees for investment banks, lawyers, accountants, and often advertising dollars for their newspapers and radio shows.

My sense is that these folks want to run as far away from environmentalists as possible. Clean energy in the United States has been defined by earnest environmentalists who, to their credit, embraced it wholeheartedly. But to our collective detriment, they spun an ideological, naïve story divorced from the reality of the energy economy transformation actually taking shape around us.

The result is that clean energy is mistakenly seen as a passive and precious solution for a future society — a delicate sunflower waving in the face of a muscular coal miner or a pristine field of green and sky of blue set against a dirt mound penetrated by a fracking rig. It feels more Utopian than aspirational, more luxury than necessity.

In short, it doesn’t feel American.

American is can-do, right-now, yes ma’am. Luckily, the actual transformation of the energy economy is as American as the Hoover Dam or the interstate highways, and even more earth-shaking. If only the discussion among politicians, media, business leaders, and the American public reflected that reality.

Unfortunately, the clean energy conversation is profoundly and unnecessarily polarizing. Like climate change itself, it’s become part of a larger culture war that fits neatly into the media’s predictable tendency of false equivalence, pitting workers against activists, businessmen against academics, and common sense against idealism. As a result, according to recent surveys, public sentiment about the urgency of action to prevent climate change is split along party lines between “let’s do something!” and “meh.”

The energy might be clean, but the work and the jobs are as rooted in dirt, sweat, and back-breaking labor as any American endeavor, and even more lasting.

We need to change the conversation to align with the deep emotional and aspirational narratives that speak to the American public. Clean energy could feel as all-American, cutting-edge, rugged, reliable, resilient, and tough as fracking. The same American ideals of independence, freedom, self-sufficiency, and opportunity can bring together green advocates and Tea Party stalwarts, labor and entrepreneursmain street and Wall Street.

Independence is the heart of American identity. Clean energy is independence turned into electrons: the application of cunning, sweat, and ingenuity to harness the restless power of the American landscape.

The American energy economy is changing, and changing rapidly. Clean energy and energy efficiency is where the growth is happening. We can move of millions people from coal mining, low-tech manufacturing, and even oil and gas into good paying jobs that don’t negatively impact the health of people and the planet.

By rebranding clean energy, we can empower all Americans to work together for a stronger future. It’s time to get down and dirty

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Deutsche Bank expects final ‘gold rush’ in the US solar market to begin in 2017

But that prediction is less than certain as a result of the negatives and positives of the 5 year ITC extension.

Article originally posted on PV Tech 

Deutsche Bank said it estimated around 8GW of primarily utility-scale projects were under various stages of development in Texas alone, while nationwide that figure stood at around 31GW, which would translate into a relatively flat 2017 market with 2016 but generate strong growth over the next three years. Image: SunPower

Deutsche Bank said it estimated around 8GW of primarily utility-scale projects were under various stages of development in Texas alone, while nationwide that figure stood at around 31GW, which would translate into a relatively flat 2017 market with 2016 but generate strong growth over the next three years. Image: SunPower

Author:  Mark Osborne

Updated: According to the latest analysis by Deutsche Bank and in contrast to market research firms, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) and GTM Research the US solar market is expected to grow in 2017, heralding in the last ‘gold rush’ period through 2020.

Deutsche Bank analyst, Vishal Shah said in a research note that PV module and inverter price declines would drive improved solar economics in 2017 and result in continued strong demand seen in the US market in 2016.

Shah noted: “This precipitous decline in module prices is also accompanied by a sharp decline in inverter prices, especially in the utility-scale and C&I [Commercial & Industrial] markets. As a result, we expect solar economics in several U.S. markets to improve significantly over the next 12-18 months. Our analysis suggests that project returns in the U.S. could likely exceed the returns solar developers achieved in other markets during prior cycle peaks and these returns are unlikely to improve as incentives gradually decline or net metering phases out. As such, we expect the final “gold rush” in the U.S. market to begin in 2017.

However, BNEF has recently cited the US ITC extension as “hurting” solar growth in 2017, due to the urgency to complete projects ahead of future ITC cuts is several years away. According to BNEF, overall US solar demand in 2017 is set to experience its first major slowdown after years of strong growth. BNEF also expects the US residential solar market to stay steady at around 2.8GW in 2017, a 0.3% increase over 2016 forecasts.

GTM Research had been the first firm to warn of a slowdown in the US market in 2017, citing utility-scale project slowdowns after the ITC extension at the end of 2016. The market research firm expected the overall US solar market to decline from around 14GW in 2016 to levels of around 7 to 8GW last seen in 2015.

Update: However, GTM Research has since told PV Tech that it latest forecast was closer to a flat year in 2017, compared to a dramatic drop. The research firm is guiding installs at 13.7GW in 2017, down slightly from 13.9GW in 2017.

A major decline in US installations is expected to occur in 2018, yet rebound to around 15GW in 2019 and over 17GW in 2020.

Deutsche Bank said it estimated around 8GW of primarily utility-scale projects were under various stages of development in Texas alone, while nationwide that figure stood at around 31GW, which would translate into a relatively flat 2017 market with 2016 but generate strong growth over the next three years.

“For 2018-20, we expect strong growth in all segments, and raise demand estimates from 13.2GW, 15.2GW and 17.4GW to 16.5GW, 18GW and 19.7GW respectively,” noted Shah.

Deutsche Bank’s forecast would seem to be the more bullish, currently.

PV module price declines steeper than expected

Only a month ago, Deutsche Bank’s Shah noted that industry participants at the SPI 2016 exhibition in Las Vegas expected average PV module prices to approach US$0.35c/W within the next 6-9 month timeframe, down from US$0.60c/W at the end of Q2, 2016.

However, Shah said in the latest report that US module prices had already declined by nearly a third in the Q3 to US$0.40c/W and were set to decline further to US$0.35c/W in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin

Poll: More than three-quarters of Americans say next president should speed up adoption of renewable energy

Originally posted on solarserver.com, the author of this piece.

As Americans count down to Election Day, more than three-quarters (78 percent) believe the winner of the presidential race should prioritize the faster adoption of renewable energy, according to the seventh annual “Sense & Sustainability” study released on September 13th, 2016 by G&S Business Communications (G&S, New York).

NREL Insolation Map - June

Solar Energy Applicability Nationwide

According to the poll, more than 4 in 5 Americans (85 percent) believe customers benefit from having alternatives to conventional power utilities, such as distributed energy resources that include rooftop solar and wind.

In addition, more than three-quarters (77 percent) say government regulators should develop a pricing model that ensures utility companies pay for excess power supplied to the grid by smaller scale, independently owned device operators.

Despite strong public sentiment favoring the next president’s focus on renewables, the G&S study found that American opinion is practically split when it comes to elected leaders and their understanding of the costs associated with fossil fuels.

More than half (52 percent) disagree, as compared to 48 percent who agree, that elected officials are well informed about fossil energy’s total costs, among them the effects of air pollution on healthcare and the impact of climate change on property insurance.

Americans believe the advantages of market competition may go beyond cost savings. More than two-thirds (68 percent) feel it is more important to have a resilient power grid than to enjoy lower electricity costs.

“Even the contentious nature of this year’s presidential campaign could not distract Americans from recognizing the importance of renewable energy to future economic growth and their own personal well-being,” said Ron Loch, G&S managing director and sustainability consulting leader.

“It’s clear that public interest is served when there are discussions about the broader financial impact of fossil energy and the need to improve both energy efficiency and the infrastructure investment required to build a resilient power grid.”

 Americans claim priority of renewables

One of the key finding from the study is that Americans voice strong support for raising the priority of renewables on the White House agenda: More than three-quarters of Americans (78 percent) believe the next president should dedicate more attention to speeding up renewable energy adoption.

Among issues ranked most influential on accelerating use of renewable energy, cost savings from energy efficiency was cited most often (26 percent), followed by energy security (23 percent) and cost to taxpayers for government incentives (19 percent).

The G&S Sense & Sustainability Study was conducted online by Harris Poll in August 2016 among 2,007 U.S. adults.

To obtain a summary of the G&S Sense & Sustainability® Study, please visit the company’s website.

Share this:
Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedin