Where Wind Farms Meet Coal County . . . . . Jobs Are Crucial But At What Cost?

As Upton Sinclair wrote, “’It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” When your livelihood depends on fossil fuel, the political, economic and environmental externalities often hold no interest. This well written and informative piece from the New York Times about competing energy types in Wyoming’s Converse County illustrates vividly this point and the energy sector job conundrum.

Health costs and fatalities caused by coal burning power plants are a seldom-identified externality in the energy jobs discussion. While coal jobs are crucial to the families in the article, nowhere is there any mention about families downwind from coal plants who experience appalling health problems.  Long term studies from the EPA and other peer- reviewed papers show that coal burning kills 15,000 people per year in the U.S. while the coal industry employs only 55,000. Not an acceptable ratio. The cost to treat illnesses from coal burning in the US exceeds 10% of our total health care costs of $3 trillion per year and equals up to 6% of GDP.

Do we need a peer reviewed energy ratio model that can be cited by journalists which states X number of energy job types creates X number of deaths and healthcare costs?

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